The Enduring Charm of Blue and White Porcelain

Blue and White Porcelain Bowl (circa 1600 - 1624)

Centuries have passed since the origin of blue and white porcelain in China. Yet, the attraction associated with blue and white tableware, vases and figurines never seems to cease. Do you know the secret of their enduring charm? To understand that you will have to briefly survey the origin of blue and white porcelain and their worldwide popularity at a time when railways and aeroplanes were the dreams of the future. Read this post and find out more about these blue and white beauties.

The Fascinating World of a Chinese Vase

Chinese Vase, Kangxi Period

A Chinese vase is revered for its exceptional beauty and intricacy of design. You are not the only one to steal admiring glances at a charming Ming vase prominently on display at the shopping window. Chinese vases are available in an extensive range of colours and designs. Before you attempt to buy a Chinese vase, familiarise yourself with the types of glazes, shapes and styles of these pieces. Use our tips to decorate your home with these delicate pieces of porcelain art. Buy Chinese vases that you could really be proud of and thoroughly enjoy the whole experience.

Hummel Figurines: The Enchanting Creations of Sister Maria Innocentia

Hummel Figurine by Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel

The angelic faces of the Hummel porcelain figurines do not fail to enchant us with their beauty and innocence. Rare Hummel figurines regularly fetch high prices. It seems surprising that these beautiful figurines could be a subject of an enormous amount of ridicule and censorship in Germany under the Nazi regime. How did Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel, the creator of the Hummel figurines, took it all? We explore her life and legacy in this article.

Fenella Elms Ceramic Sculptures: The Uncertainty of Fragility

An Interview with the Ceramic Artist

Wall Mounted, Ceramic Sculpture by Fenella Elms

Born in 1964 it is not until she turned 40 that Fenella Elms’s actively started modelling dreams on potter’s wheel. She was working as an Occupational Therapist for National Health Services then and found it befitting to create structures and patterns using ceramics as a medium. A recipient of Ceramic Review Award for Exceptional, Innovative and Challenging work at Ceramic Art London, Royal College of Art in 2011 Fenella’s work is a narration in ‘fragile permanence’.