Posts tagged with ‘documentary’

My Experiences are My Pictures

Giovanni Savino

In the heart of any successful story lies man, man as a sentient being, der Mensch as in German or manushya as in Sanskrit; the great doer and the chronicler, an observer as well as the observed. He picks up his instruments of creativity, a pen, a brush, a camera, facial or bodily expressions, voice and so on. He becomes a narrator. He keeps registering events or things that stir his passions through means that he chooses for himself. He weaves himself in his story just as much as he describes his outer world in his narrative. In fact, he becomes his story. The audience too does not remain isolated from the premises of his storytelling but becomes a part of it. In that respect, Giovanni Savino is at once a protagonist, an author and a critic of the many tales that he endeavours to narrate each day. After all, these are nothing but mini episodes of his great life’s show, the core of his creative self. Camera in hand he observes each moment as a precious uncut diamond waiting to be given shape and context to let it shimmer in exhilaration. The weather–beaten traveller that he is Giovanni knows the how a man’s freedom and restriction both lie in these four letters, Time. The acute awareness of it driven him from his birthplace the Tuscan landscape to Dominican Republic and now New York with many stops in between. The consciousness of the same also motivated him to extract the maximum out of his own self, day in and day out, testimonies of which galore on the pages of his illustrious albums and now in this thoughtful interview.

‘Pilgrim, trudge on: what makes thy soul complain,
Crowns thy complaint; the way to rest is pain:
The road to resolution lies by doubt;
The next way home’s the farthest way about.’
Francis Quarles

Capturing the Ever Vanishing Present

Laura Barisonzi

Laura Barisonzi prefers capturing images of her subjects in natural surroundings instead of depending on the tried and tested ambience of the studios. The NYC photographer also likes showcasing people in action. Since she often works with sportspersons, fitness fanatics and dancers, particularly for her commercial assignments, this aspect of her visual narratives thrives on an added dimension. The photographs, exuding a youthful verve, appeal to the senses of the audience. However, as an artist she does not want any stereotypes. So every now and then, camera in hand, Laura embarks on a trip to gratify her inner creative. Her restless eyes keep searching for ‘stories’ in the obscure shades and corners of New York and beyond, before she finalises on the latest topic for her explorations.

In challenging herself Laura finds great satisfaction, for only by doing so she manages capturing such evocative images that otherwise would have been beyond her. Her dedication towards her craft also forces her to stay super–fit as she needs spending long hours under the sun. An outdoor–oriented person and admirer of many sporting activities, this aspect of her work too does not bother her unduly. Many years ago Paul Cézanne said, ‘Right now a moment is fleeting by! Capture its reality in paint! To do that we must put all else out of our minds. We must become that moment, make ourselves a sensitive recording plate. Give the image of what we actually see, forgetting everything that has been seen before our time.’ This holds true for the making of any visual representation, painting, sculpture or photography, for artists before and after Cézanne, including, such talents as Laura Barisonzi.

The Urban Reality & Photography

An Interview with Viviana Peretti

The fact that a city so readily divulges her secrets to Viviana Peretti, or more aptly to her camera lenses, does not come as a big surprise. Viviana spent much of her childhood and teens in a small town close to Rome, greater part of a decade in bustling Bogotá, Colombia, briefly spent time in beautiful Marseille, France while firmly anchoring herself in the global village of New York. In true sense, as in life so through her art, Viviana has treaded from serenity to pandemonium before being back to orderliness. The artist is also an anthropologist who graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Rome in 1997. Viviana is fluent in multiple languages besides being proficient with the language of images. Nine years spent in Colombia have provided her with the necessary impetus to document lives of people around her as viewed from her own unique perspective. In 2010, she duly earned a degree in Documentary Photography and Photojournalism from the International Center of Photography in New York.

Unlike many other photographers of her generation Viviana Peretti finds herself equally adept in using analogue, digital cameras or even iPhone for the purpose of storytelling. These are only instruments for her to be used in accordance to the objective of the visual narratives akin to a painter’s choice of medium or different types of brushes. She also loves the freedom of selecting the subject of her photographic essays for herself, so much so, that often for her personal projects she captures the imagery for a particular series first and then pitches it to media for publication. It is undoubtedly an extremely risky venture, something that many would dare not attempt. But she hardly believes in a set formula for success. Viviana received numerous fellowships and awards including the Sony World Photography Award earlier this year. She keeps herself devoted in honing her skills as her reputation increases by the day and her photographs are featured in many esteemed newspaper and periodicals across the globe. She is determined to give every flying minute something to keep in store.

Building a Visual Story

An Interview with Matilde Gattoni

For over a decade now Matilde Gattoni’s camera lens is faithfully capturing myriad facets of life as experienced in India or Eritrea, Uzbekistan or Iran, Syria or Somalia. Born in 1974, Matilde Gattoni studied History in Universite’ des Sciences Humaines, Strasbourg, France, before giving in to her passion for photography. Ironically, as she now treads the different parts of the world camera in hand she lets her own visual essays to be a part of mankind’s history.

Matilde’s career as a photojournalist commenced when she was travelling in Israel and ended up covering the second Intifada early last decade. In the process she received much acclaim not only from her fellow photographers but also from aficionados of the art. Since 2007, her name was a permanent feature in more than one International Photography Awards (IPA). For her project Drought and Fear in the Horn of Africa she received bronze medal in Px3 Prix de la Photographie in 2012. Her visual portrayal, The Swallows of Syria, earned her 3rd place in Portfolio Lens Culture International Exposure Awards, 2012. Matilde was also associated in the making of Uzbekistan, 10 years after independence, Tranchida Editore, Milan, 2002 with renowned journalist Ahmed Rashid. A similar endeavour with Cartiere del Garda produced A better time in 2008.

Whether, it is in The Swallows of Syria or in The Devil in Me, the plight of women feature prominently in many of Matilde Gattoni’s visual narratives. Similarly, their victories also receive due attention as could be seen through her photographic essay on Elham Al Qasim, the first woman from UAE to reach North Pole. Over a period of time she also diversified and set out exploring a wide range of topics from architectural marvels, posh interiors to high octane sports like Formula One but always with a humane touch. Read the full interview with Matilde Gattoni to learn more about her and her work as she is busy in ‘catching’ the ‘transient hour’.

Exploring the Possibilities of the World

Through Jody MacDonald’s Eyes

Jody MacDonald learned to appreciate remote landscapes and foreign cultures early in her life. A childhood spent in Saudi Arabia has been a big help in her effort of deciphering an exotic climate. So, now when she paraglides over a forgotten piece of land or holds a tête–à–tête with a little known soul in some remote corner of the globe she feels completely at home. The photographer traverses the land, delves deep into the water and darts into the cool gale for locating and capturing that elusive photographic moment that seems wonderfully ‘perfect’. But being the purist that she is, it is extremely difficult for her to be satisfied with her craft and she continues to hone her skills. In 2006, Jody, in order to satisfy her thirst of both art and adventure, conceived The Best Odyssey. She and her partner, Gavin McClurg, trot the whole world sailing, surfing or spearfishing on the Pacific and Indian Ocean. Needless to say, these wild expeditions make Jody blissfully happy. For Jody it could aptly be said that, ‘Life is either a daring adventure or nothing. Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature.’