Posts tagged with ‘architecture’

Terracotta Art of Bengal

It was a potent time for creative explorations. Inspired by Sri Chaitanya’s bhakti1 movement, people were in search of newer ways to forge ties – between themselves, between the self and the universe and beyond. 16th century Bengal2 was experiencing a resurgence which not only prompted poets and artists to find various forms of expressions, but also resulted in a rapid development of its own language. Architects and sculptors of the era grabbed this opportunity to create some of the finest works of terracotta art.

The Limitless Possibilities of a City

In the Artistic Realm of Nathan Walsh

An artist’s eyes always remain engaged in search of visual poetry even at the seemingly unlikeliest of the places. The rhythm in massive brick structures, nostalgia associated with rain soaked streets or the irony of multitude jostling in every street corner without even knowing each other hardly ever eludes Nathan Walsh. And, the artist loyally keeps on registering every mood of a throbbing city on canvas. Be it on the Sicilian Avenue, in the Rainy Afternoon in Chicago or in New York Sunshine Nathan Walsh’s mind remains ever alert picking up the glittering verses that the city whispers into his ears. He also takes artistic liberty in fusing time and space to create paintings like 23 Skidoo or Multiverse – a playful geometric maze that can only be painted through such creative consciousness.

Nathan Walsh was born in 1972, Lincoln, United Kingdom. He completed BFA from Liverpool School of Art and then earned his MFA from University of Hull. His unique artwork has been exhibited worldwide, including in Metro Gallery, Australia 2012, KIAF 11 Korean International Art Fair, Seoul, Korea 2011, Persterer Gallery, Zürich, Switzerland 2010, Strictly Visual, Lois Lambert Gallery, California 2005 and SW1 Gallery, London. His name is mentioned along with many other prominent artists in British Artists since 1945, London: Art Dictionaries LTD by David Buckman. Learn more of Nathan Walsh as he continues his exploration of urban vista through the vocabulary he is most skilled at – art.

Building a Visual Story

An Interview with Matilde Gattoni

For over a decade now Matilde Gattoni’s camera lens is faithfully capturing myriad facets of life as experienced in India or Eritrea, Uzbekistan or Iran, Syria or Somalia. Born in 1974, Matilde Gattoni studied History in Universite’ des Sciences Humaines, Strasbourg, France, before giving in to her passion for photography. Ironically, as she now treads the different parts of the world camera in hand she lets her own visual essays to be a part of mankind’s history.

Matilde’s career as a photojournalist commenced when she was travelling in Israel and ended up covering the second Intifada early last decade. In the process she received much acclaim not only from her fellow photographers but also from aficionados of the art. Since 2007, her name was a permanent feature in more than one International Photography Awards (IPA). For her project Drought and Fear in the Horn of Africa she received bronze medal in Px3 Prix de la Photographie in 2012. Her visual portrayal, The Swallows of Syria, earned her 3rd place in Portfolio Lens Culture International Exposure Awards, 2012. Matilde was also associated in the making of Uzbekistan, 10 years after independence, Tranchida Editore, Milan, 2002 with renowned journalist Ahmed Rashid. A similar endeavour with Cartiere del Garda produced A better time in 2008.

Whether, it is in The Swallows of Syria or in The Devil in Me, the plight of women feature prominently in many of Matilde Gattoni’s visual narratives. Similarly, their victories also receive due attention as could be seen through her photographic essay on Elham Al Qasim, the first woman from UAE to reach North Pole. Over a period of time she also diversified and set out exploring a wide range of topics from architectural marvels, posh interiors to high octane sports like Formula One but always with a humane touch. Read the full interview with Matilde Gattoni to learn more about her and her work as she is busy in ‘catching’ the ‘transient hour’.

Using Imagination

A Conversation with Kurt Wenner

The history of street painting could be traced back to the sixteenth century Italy where artists replicated their commissioned artworks from cathedral etc to the streets of northern Italy. Artists came to be known as ‘madonnari’ as they often reproduced images of Madonna. Sometimes earning their living solely depended on the coins thrown onto their work as a token of appreciation from passers - by.

After completion of studies from Rhode Island School of Design and Art Center College of Design and serving a stint with NASA as an advanced scientific space Illustrator Kurt Wenner was finally forced to pay heed to his heart’s desire. In 1982 he left NASA for Italy to explore more of Renaissance classicism. He became the first American artist to win the top prize at the Grazie di Curtatone competition for three consecutive years and received the title Master Street Painter. In 1985, National Geographic documented Kurt’s unique and innovative works of art in their award winning film Masterpieces in Chalk.