Matilde Gattoni Photography: Building a Visual Story

An Conversation with the Photographer

The Love of the Land, Photography by Matilde Gattoni

Matilde’s career as a photojournalist commenced when she was travelling in Israel and ended up covering the second Intifada early last decade. In the process she received much acclaim not only from her fellow photographers but also from aficionados of the art. Since 2007, her name was a permanent feature in more than one International Photography Awards (IPA). For her project Drought and Fear in the Horn of Africa she received bronze medal in Px3 Prix de la Photographie in 2012. Her visual portrayal, The Swallows of Syria, earned her 3rd place in Portfolio Lens Culture International Exposure Awards, 2012. Matilde was also associated in the making of Uzbekistan, 10 years after independence, Tranchida Editore, Milan, 2002 with renowned journalist Ahmed Rashid. A similar endeavour with Cartiere del Garda produced A better time in 2008.

Jody MacDonald: Exploring the Possibilities of the World

An Interview with Adventure Sports & Documentary Photographer

Bare Trees, Photography by Jody MacDonald

Jody MacDonald learned to appreciate remote landscapes and foreign cultures early in her life. A childhood spent in Saudi Arabia has been a big help in her effort of deciphering an exotic climate. So, now when she paraglides over a forgotten piece of land or holds a tête–à–tête with a little known soul in some remote corner of the globe she feels completely at home. The photographer traverses the land, delves deep into the water and darts into the cool gale for locating and capturing that elusive photographic moment that seems wonderfully ‘perfect’. But being the purist that she is, it is extremely difficult for her to be satisfied with her craft and she continues to hone her skills.

Martin Klimek: An Inveterate Image Maker

A Conversation with the Photographer

In India, Photography by Martin Klimek

Martin Klimek continuously documents life as he views it. His photographic essays depict an irresistible élan vital that not only draws the attention of the audience but also engages into a conversation, albeit mute to the outside world, with them. At the end of the day when one finishes glancing over the pages of his album one senses how united everyone is in joys and pathos; it feels that one has just woke from a deep reverie; it seems one was treading the long forgotten dusty lanes of one’s own memory lane than shifting the pages to see some ‘unknown’ faces and ‘foreign’ environment.

Billy Dodson Wildlife Photography: Totally Captivated by Africa

An Interview with the Wildlife Photographer

Lion Cub Plays with Mother, Photography by Billy Dodson

It is a trip to Tanzania in 2001 that influenced Billy’s course of life in many ways. Not only he visited and revisited the continent many times since to fulfill his passion for photography but also to collaborate actively with many institutions striving to preserve the wealth of African fauna. He is a patron of Giraffe Conservation Foundation. He also regularly donates images both for spreading awareness about the cause and also to help in raising funds for African Wildlife Foundation, the Nature Conservancy and other conservation initiatives. That his art has found a greater purpose beyond being a source of a positive delight for the audience is perhaps his greatest achievement.

Marsel van Oosten Wildlife Photography: A Single Minded Idea

An Exclusive Interview with the Nature & Wildlife Photographer

Elephant at Victoria Falls, Photography by Marsel van Oosten

Marsel van Oosten used photography as a way of injecting life into the hectic pace that he was living at. With a full time career in advertising with two gold lions at the prestigious International Advertising Festival, Cannes, France, against his name there was little time for him to think of anything else. A trip to Tanzania however changed a lot of things in Marsel’s life. In the close proximity of the wilderness the roar of lions and the laugh of hyenas felt like music to the ears. Life started charting a new route. Five years after this experience Marsel found the charm of his new love to be too overwhelming to ignore. He gladly switched his advertising career with his new identity, the wildlife photographer.